Suicide Prevention Awareness


Every year thousands of individuals die by suicide, leaving behind their friends and family members to navigate the tragedy of loss. In many cases, friends and families affected by a suicide loss (often called “suicide loss survivors”) are left in the dark. 

Crisis Resources

  • If you or someone you know is in an emergency, call 911 immediately.
  • If you are in crisis or are experiencing difficult or suicidal thoughts, call the National Suicide Hotline at 1-800-273 TALK (8255)
  • If you’re uncomfortable talking on the phone, you can also text NAMI to 741-741 to be connected to a free, trained crisis counselor on the Crisis Text Line.

Awareness Resources

Help promote awareness by sharing images and graphics on your website and social media accounts. Use #SuicidePrevention or #StigmaFree.

Suicide prevention is important to address year-round and the truth is, we can all benefit from honest conversations about mental health conditions and suicide, because just one conversation can change a life.

It is important to reference crisis resources throughout the month. Here are some suggested social posts featuring helpful information: 

  • The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (@800273TALK) offers free, confidential crisis counseling 24/7/365 - and you don’t have to be in crisis to call. #SPM20 #NotAlone 
  • .@CrisisTextLine is free 24/7 mental health support at your fingertips. Text “NAMI” to 741741 for help. #SPM20 #NotAlone 
  • Crisis episodes related to mental illness can be incredibly difficult. To help navigate through them, NAMI created this downloadable guide available in English and Spanish: nami.org/crisisguide #SPM20 #NotAlone

Hashtags to Use: #SPM20 or #NotAlone

Fast Facts

Individual Impact: 

  • 75% of all people who die by suicide are male.    
  • Although more women than men attempt suicide, men are nearly 4x more likely to die by suicide.  
  • Suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death for people ages 10-34 and the 4th leading cause of death for people 35-54      
  • The overall suicide rate in the U.S. has increased by 31% since 2001  
  • 46% of people who die by suicide had a diagnosed mental health condition  
  • While half of individuals who die by suicide have a diagnosed mental health condition, research shows that 90% experienced symptoms.

Community Impact: 

  • In 2017, suicide was: 
    • the second leading cause of death for American Indian/Alaska Natives between the ages of 10-34.1  
    • the second leading cause of death for African Americans, ages 15-24.1  
    • the leading cause of death for Asian Americans, ages 15-24.1
    • the second leading cause of death for Hispanic people in the U.S., ages 15-34. 
  • American Indian/Alaska Native adults die by suicide at a rate 20% higher than 
  • non-Hispanic white adults.  
  • Lesbian, gay and bisexual youth are four times more likely to attempt suicide than straight youth.  
  • Transgender people are 12 times more likely to attempt suicide than the general population.  
  • 10% of young adults say they experienced suicidal thoughts in the past year.   

1CDC. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS). [Accessed 08/02/2019]. https://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/index.html